Taking the Anti-Piracy Argument Back From the Music Industry

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electrizer
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Re: Taking the Anti-Piracy Argument Back From the Music Indu

Postby electrizer » Thu Jan 29, 2015 5:39 am

A countrywide survey in December 2014 showed that just 4% of Norwegians under 30 years still used illegal file-sharing platforms to get hold of music. Even better for the worldwide industry, less than 1% of people under 30 years said that file-sharing was their main source of obtaining music. Compare that to a 2009 survey by the IFPI and GramArt, which showed that 70% of the population under 30 years who had internet access were illegally downloading music. The reason for this near-complete erosion of piracy in the region is clear: young people now have a better option. 75% of Norway’s recorded music industry income now comes from streaming services such as Spotify and Tidal/WiMP.


http://www.musicbusinessworldwide.com/piracy-virtually-eliminated-norway/

There's an interesting comment to this article on the website saying: "IFPI didn't eliminate piracy. Spotify did. And IFPI have been fighting Spotify from the start."
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Re: Taking the Anti-Piracy Argument Back From the Music Indu

Postby Paul Marangoni » Wed Oct 14, 2015 7:18 am

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-34268474

The pop star and the prophet

Musicians aren't likely to get rich from selling records today, unlike their 20th Century predecessors - and one man saw it all coming a long time ago.
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electrizer
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Re: Taking the Anti-Piracy Argument Back From the Music Indu

Postby electrizer » Wed Oct 14, 2015 8:28 am

'No more gatekeepers' my ass. You either get discovered or get a job.
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Re: Taking the Anti-Piracy Argument Back From the Music Indu

Postby electrizer » Mon Nov 09, 2015 2:55 pm

EU is the new Communism. Period. Might not affect a lot of US-based folks here but this illustrates what lobbying leads to.

https://juliareda.eu/2015/11/ancillary-copyright-2-0-the-european-commission-is-preparing-a-frontal-attack-on-the-hyperlink/

According to a draft communication on copyright reform leaked yesterday (via IPKat), the Commission is considering putting the simple act of linking to content under copyright protection. This idea flies in the face of both existing interpretation and spirit of the law as well as common sense. Each weblink would become a legal landmine and would allow press publishers to hold every single actor on the Internet liable.
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Re: Taking the Anti-Piracy Argument Back From the Music Indu

Postby Paul Marangoni » Fri Jan 29, 2016 10:47 am

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Re: Taking the Anti-Piracy Argument Back From the Music Indu

Postby Old Pit Guy » Sun Jan 31, 2016 5:07 am

I don't think enough people care about music and art to right the ship.
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Re: Taking the Anti-Piracy Argument Back From the Music Indu

Postby Paul Marangoni » Tue Feb 02, 2016 8:46 pm

Is MusicAnswers the Answer?
Shelly Peiken
Grammy-Nominated Songwriter; Author, "Confessions of a Serial Songwriter"

A few months ago I went to Washington, D.C. to advocate for songwriters' rights. Consent decrees that were established in 1941 still determine the rates that songwriters are paid and they haven't been reassessed to take into account the realities of the digital marketplace. It's been 75 years.

Do you know what the congresspeople told me? They said we, the creative community, have to get our act together. When the tech lobby comes to Capitol Hill it is unified and strong. It speaks with one voice: streaming rates are fine the way they are, in fact, they should be lower; streaming gives an artist free exposure which can lead to monetization in other ways. Creators should be thankful. There's nothing more they can do about piracy. Don't break the internet. Bla Bla Bla. But we--songwriters, performers, producers and composers--are divided in our message. And it's true...we're all over the place.

For instance, songwriters (and composers) come to Washington to support bills like the Songwriters Equity Act which would set rates at fair market value and remove the provision that prevents the federal rate court from considering relevant evidence when setting the royalty rates for a public performance. (As for the idea that we should be thankful for the exposure...well, the same could be said for eateries: serve free meals that people love and the people will return! How about a free drink too?)

Performers on the other hand, go to D.C. to advocate for The Fair Play Fair Pay Act. This bill states that recording artists should be paid performance royalties when their voices are broadcast on the radio--a no-brainer. Performers have another issue too: record labels receive the lion's share of revenue that Spotify pays out, and they in turn are expected to compensate their artists. So why do performers receive a fraction of their due? The math remains a mystery. I feel their pain but as a songwriter, I'm fighting my own battle.

Producers have put forth the AMP (Allocation for Music Producers Act), which would create a structure for producers, mixers and engineers to participate in royalties for the songs they work on and allow them to receive direct payment through SoundExchange. Sounds good to me!

Thing is, we all deserve what we're asking for. But because we're all coming at it from different directions we're driving the lawmakers crazy. They tell us to go home and come back when we can agree on how to proceed. Tech loves this. It keeps our community divided, streaming rates low, recording artists disenfranchised and producers overlooked.

Creative people need to get on the same page. People in Washington know that the laws need to be updated. But we won't have a voice at the table if we don't unify so that our voice will count.

A new movement called MusicAnswers launched recently. And it affirms something I think we can all agree with:

Music has never been more popular, more accessible, or more valuable. Billions of people around the globe rely on it to enhance their lives. Overall revenue from the use of music has increased exponentially, but only a tiny fraction is finding its way to the people who actually create the music and recordings. The business of music has become unsustainable for those who make it.

So...

Is MusicAnswers the answer to everything that ails us?
I don't know but it's definitely a step toward the solution.

Does it have muscle? Can it stand up against the all powerful tech lobby?
Umm, movements start with voices. Who would have thought there'd be any push-back against the tobacco lobby?

I've signed so many petitions.
Sign another.

Aren't they all the same?
This one is different. It unites the hearts, minds, interests and wallets of songwriters, performers, producers and composers.

Even if I never write another hit song again I want to preserve the dignity of my profession. I want songwriting (and yes--composing, performing and producing) to continue to be a legitimate occupation in which good people who work hard can at least make a living. And that right there my friends, is what hangs in the balance: will the creation of music exist in the future as a viable profession for anyone other than the most super of superstars?

Consider adding your name to the list of those who endorse Music Answers. You'll be in good company.



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/shelly-pe ... 07678.html
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Old Pit Guy
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Re: Taking the Anti-Piracy Argument Back From the Music Indu

Postby Old Pit Guy » Wed Feb 03, 2016 4:27 am

I don't know which is more strange: That lawmakers are unable to effect sensible legislation that regulates fair and equitable commerce in music without a lobbying arm padding their pockets or writing it for them, or that telling the people most damaged by the exploitation to write it themselves and come back in force is somehow acceptable representation.
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Re: Taking the Anti-Piracy Argument Back From the Music Indu

Postby Paul Marangoni » Wed Feb 03, 2016 7:07 am

Old Pit Guy wrote:I don't know which is more strange:.


I don't think you understand the amount of money that Google spends making sure that change doesn't happen.
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