Assorted videos / YouTube thread

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langmick
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Re: Assorted videos / YouTube thread

Postby langmick » Sat Nov 18, 2017 4:49 pm

Saw Gary H play with John McLaughlin a couple days ago. His kb playing was on par with JM's guitar playing, he was as dynamic and as interesting. High level playing. One of the things I picked up on was the dynamics they all played with, there was one tune that was meditative and a slow burn. Very mezzoforte, very controlled. It blew me away.

Then he got on Jeff Sipe's kit, did a duet with Ranjit Barot on konnakol and the whole show was taken up a notch, he hits hard. He probably didn't need sound reinforcement. He was having fun too, very humorous playing. The crowd loved it.

It starts at 9:20.



There is something about the notes and patterns with the MO music. Just grabs you, the melodies are so interesting.

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langmick
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Re: Assorted videos / YouTube thread

Postby langmick » Sat Nov 18, 2017 5:57 pm

Searching through youtube for Newmark nuggets. Discogs.com is wild.

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langmick
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Re: Assorted videos / YouTube thread

Postby langmick » Sat Nov 18, 2017 6:13 pm

Tom B with Etienne M'bappe, who is touring with McLaughlin, he plays with such taste, but then can go crazy with streams of notes.

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Pocketplayer
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Re: Assorted videos / YouTube thread

Postby Pocketplayer » Sun Nov 19, 2017 5:57 pm

Hard to find without liner notes who played on what, Newmark or Keltner,
but this one was a favorite...I think it's Andy--Dream Weaver goodness

Jeff Porcaro Groove Master
http://jeffporcaro.blogspot.com
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Pocketplayer
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Re: Assorted videos / YouTube thread

Postby Pocketplayer » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:57 am



“After knowing this kind of musical information one can then begin to construct and orchestrate a musical drum part that has some substance along with a musical shape to it.”

With that in mind, we felt it was valuable to demonstrate the fascinating way that Elvin orchestrated his drum part to compliment a song’s melody. Elvin’s composition titled “Three Card Molly” really captured my imagination. I will never forget the time back in May of 1979 when Elvin stayed at my home. I asked if he could show me how he orchestrated that particular drum part, and he graciously sat down behind my drum set and began to demonstrate his rhythmic phrasing of the melody. Needless to say, I asked if he could please play it slowly so I could try to grasp the complexity and nuances of his drumming. With my tape recorder running, I stood there and watched in amazement the work of a true drum genius.

Concerning the following musical transcription, it’s very important to understand that the drumming of Elvin Jones is beyond any transcription. Musical notation has its limits, especially when it comes to jazz performance. One cannot notate such significant and personalized characteristics as pure emotion, human spirit, truth, and intensity, or that incredible loose and relaxed feel that was such an important part of that unmistakable Elvin Jones sound.

Performance Notes. “Three Card Molly” is made up of two different melodic phrases. The A phrases are eight measures in length, while the B phrase (or bridge) is four measures long. Compare the lead sheet melody with the drum transcription and notice how every note of the melody has been orchestrated with Elvin’s unique use of triplet phrasing. The accents notated on both the melody page and the drum part should help provide you with a basic reference point.

Elvin masterfully interprets the “contrast” phrase at letter B, creating almost primal patterns using toms and bass drum. This, along with his shifting accents, both complements and shapes the rising and falling tension of the melodic line. His rhythmic phrasing during the bridge is quite polyrhythmic and highly syncopated, yet he always makes it groove and swing so damn hard — it’s just phenomenal! As mentioned earlier, Elvin plays some things that are beyond notation, and his part during the bridge is one of those instances. The A and B phrases clearly demonstrate Elvin’s uncanny ability to come up with unique textural and rhythmic phrases that “play the music” as only he can.

I do not hear solos even remotely close to this for the past 30 years or more...

Jeff Porcaro Groove Master
http://jeffporcaro.blogspot.com
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Morgenthaler
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Re: Assorted videos / YouTube thread

Postby Morgenthaler » Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:51 pm

I hired Frank as part of Paulo Mendonca's trio for my 40th birthday bash earlier this year.

Frank is a beast.

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langmick
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Re: Assorted videos / YouTube thread

Postby langmick » Tue Nov 21, 2017 6:58 pm

Damn, he is smooth.
amoergosum
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Re: Assorted videos / YouTube thread

Postby amoergosum » Thu Nov 23, 2017 1:17 pm

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Paul Marangoni
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Re: Assorted videos / YouTube thread

Postby Paul Marangoni » Thu Nov 23, 2017 8:53 pm

****************
Jazz Martyrs
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Odd-Arne Oseberg
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Re: Assorted videos / YouTube thread

Postby Odd-Arne Oseberg » Fri Nov 24, 2017 1:18 pm





Unbeknownst to many, odd time is just short for Odd-Arne time.

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